Should You Perform Painting while Pregnant?

Should You or Should You Not Paint while Pregnant?

This is a difficult question as you want your baby’s room to be primed and prepped for the acrylic paintsarrival of the new one, but you do not want to put you or your baby in any danger as well. Despite all of this, the answer to the question above is quite simple; if you do your research and go in prepared, there is absolutely no reason not to paint your baby’s nursery! This article will help create a platform for research, but you should also look around yourself to see what will work best for you!

Paint Stripping

If you live in a home that was built (or more importantly painted) before 1970, your old paint probably has some lead in it, which needless to say is not good for the baby. Your time to shine will come in no time, but you should hire, or get, someone else to do this job for you. Being exposed to lead could seriously damage your baby’s development.

Choose the Right Time

According to British National Health Services, expectant mothers should wait to paint their baby’s room until they are at least 14 weeks along. Research states that paint fumes have been shown to not affect the fetus too much, but the most harm that could be done to the baby would happen during the first trimester when all of the vital organs are developing.

Choose the Right Paint

VOC’s are the parts of paint that are toxic and make you sick, and unfortunately it is not too difficult for a paint company to get a label that reads zero-VOC when in-fact it is just low-VOC. Luckily, there are paint companies out there such as Lullaby Paints that have undergone extensive tests to prove they are truly zero-VOC. If you do not have this paint available to you, it is best to go for a high-quality latex paint as opposed to oil paint. Finally, do not use spray paints at all; not only do they have chemicals that could harm your baby, but they release paint molecules into the air, increasing your chance of inhaling them.

Ventilation

To avoid stagnant paint fumes, open all doors and windows of the room. If you do not have a ceiling fan, it might be smart to look into getting a cheap box fan just to keep the air moving. If you are painting furniture, or some other small item, it is best to do this outside where there is no shortage of fresh air. Remember to keep the ventilation going for a week or so after you paint, you do not want to lock up any fumes or toxins in the nursery.

Where Appropriate Attire

The easiest way to protect your baby from the possible harming effects of the paint is to avoid the inhalation, or skin-on-skin contact with it. Buying a painter’s mask at the hardware store is a cheap and easy way to assure that you are not inhaling hurtful fumes. Wearing long sleeves, long pants, and possibly gloves also greatly reduces your risk of coming in contact with anything toxic.